Artun Alaska Arasli & James Beckett – Hospice / 29.10. – 12.12.2015
28. Oktober 2015
Video-Documentation Ryan McLaughlin’s talk at Kölnischer Kunstverein
8. Januar 2016

Aaron Angell
Variations on the Chaldon Doom

February 12th – April 2nd 2016
Opening: February 12th 2016, 6 pm

Aaron Angell
Variations on the Chaldon Doom

Sad as Dowland

Not
primarily for love yet
sad as Dowland I
am thinking beyond
the millions of things. That the
structure that does not exist is yet more real I
neither fathom nor query. It is the
smear, the
blossom on void I am
baffled by, overtossed
and would be as
dumb as-
(though wd for
choic evaporate
utterly into the waste of coordinates

D.M. Black, 1969
I spent a lot of time when I was a child building bonfires and riding some sort of motorbike in a ruined field behind the small church which holds the Chaldon Doom. Our ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’, this 12th century ochre painting of the purgatorial ladder is unique in Europe and probably the world. It follows a cruciform composition in order to aid with the reading of the painting’s activity, a by-product of which is that it also splits the composition of the image into a manageable grid. The vertical beam is a ladder, the crossbeam a bar of clouds. I have made eight new pictures on glass for this exhibition which are deeply influenced by its combined compositional balance and clutter of symbolism.

Aaron Angell
Variations on the Chaldon Doom

Sad as Dowland

Not
primarily for love yet
sad as Dowland I
am thinking beyond
the millions of things. That the
structure that does not exist is yet more real I
neither fathom nor query. It is the
smear, the
blossom on void I am
baffled by, overtossed
and would be as
dumb as-
(though wd for
choic evaporate
utterly into the waste of coordinates

D.M. Black, 1969
I spent a lot of time when I was a child building bonfires and riding some sort of motorbike in a ruined field behind the small church which holds the Chaldon Doom. Our ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’, this 12th century ochre painting of the purgatorial ladder is unique in Europe and probably the world. It follows a cruciform composition in order to aid with the reading of the painting’s activity, a by-product of which is that it also splits the composition of the image into a manageable grid. The vertical beam is a ladder, the crossbeam a bar of clouds. I have made eight new pictures on glass for this exhibition which are deeply influenced by its combined compositional balance and clutter of symbolism.