BENJAMIN RAMIREZ PÉREZ – Summer Heat An Early Frost
27. Oktober 2020
new works by #1
27. April 2021

Fire demands its Fuel

NOAH BARKER, ERICA BAUM, JUAN DOWNEY, ROCHELLE FEINSTEIN, IRMA HÜNERFAUTH, JEAN KATAMBAYI MUKENDI, KITTY KRAUS, PHUNG-TIEN PHAN, SCHMELZDAHIN, GESCHICHTSWERKSTATT MÖNCHENGLADBACH

Curated by Elisa R. Linn & Lennart Wolff (KM Temporaer)

Markus Lüttgen, Düsseldorf
DREI, Cologne
An der Stadtmauer 6, Mönchengladbach
24.04.–05.06.2021


due to pandemic restrictions
the show is on view on appointment only
- please contact the gallery for details -




Kindly supported by
Stiftung Kunstfonds & Neustart Kultur





Fire demands its Fuel
April 2021

In 1827, the textile entrepreneur Wilhelm Dietrich Lenssen hastily sketched the workings of mechanical looms in England into his travel diary. The risky industrial espionage paid off when, in the same year, the first steam engine was set in motion in Rheydt. Soon the machines in the Lower Rhine region required a large number of factory workers, large-scale coal mining, and iron and steel production. The early "fires" of industrialization grew to engulf the region transforming Mönchengladbach into the "German Manchester" of textile production. Harnessing this new power disrupted not only the landscape and social fabric but also the understanding of historicity and the future. The constraint of natural cycles, day and night, seasons, and absolute space seemed surmountable, unleashing the promise of growth. New energy systems gave birth to new energy cultures. To this day, the burning of former fauna and flora, since condensed into coal and oil, is no less mystifying than the concept of energy itself. As the ability to emit heat, radiate light, or perform work, energy is ubiquitous yet hardly tangible. Easier to grasp are the particular technologies, histories, politics, and institutions of a system founded on fossil capital (Andreas Malm), which continues to determine the horizon of thought and action, as well as visual culture. Inevitably art is interwoven with conflicts over resource extraction, from Garzweiler to Lubumbashi. In the former office and workshop of the electrical-sanitary-heating family business F.W. Mertens jr. located in Mönchengladbach since 1875, the exhibition 'Fire demands its Fuel' turns to the relationship between art, energy, and fossil capitalism.

Working in the copper and cobalt mining city of Lubumbashi and trained as an electrical engineer and mathematician, artist Jean Katambayi Mukendi (b. 1974) operates at the nexus of energy, ecology, and the post-colonial in the Democratic Republic of Congo. His “Afrolamps“ geometric ballpoint pen drawings of stylized light bulbs and circuits - as well as a sculpture made entirely of paper, cardboard and a few electrical parts, move between technical construction sketches and prototypes for a self-determined appropriation of technology.

The reproduction of the 1975 competition drawing for the expansion of the oil city Houston’s Museum of Art by Chilean artist and trained architect Juan Downey (1940-1993) is also situated between utopian vision and concrete architectural and infrastructure projects. Two years after the military coup in his home country that followed the expropriation of international mining corporations, Downey designed a self-sufficient and regenerative geothermal system for the building that would generate steam for heating and cooling. Originally, Downey suggested to the museum's director that oil should flow from the walls of the exhibit spaces. Natural and man-made energy systems permeate Downey's work, which is based on early experiments with video, computer art, and cybernetics.

The kinetic sculpture Blaue Pistole (Blue Gun), made by postwar artist Irma Hünerfauth (1907-1998), functions as a sound object in which a composition of metal scrap pieces is set into vibration as if by a "gust of nature's wind" (Hünerfauth). The poem to be heard, written, and spoken by the artist, exposes the deceptive peace of the affluent society of her time, which, still surrounded by World War II scrap, was already busily rearming. In the exhibition, Hünerfauth's "Talking Box" ultimately alludes to the importance of arms manufacturing as a motor of fossil industrialization.

The cartoon-like "Bombs" by the Essen-based artist Phung-Tien Phan (*1983) figuratively push the destructive potential of unleashed energy to the extreme. On closer inspection, the objects turn out to be black-painted vegetables and fruits that begin to rot and germinate over the course of the exhibitions. In doing so, they take the symbolic logic of a phallic capitalism ad absurdum, which distances itself from and at the same time subjugates domestic manual labor and a feminized nature.

The “bombs“ sculpturally exaggerated danger is contrasted by the minimalist work of Kitty Kraus (*1976). In the basement rooms, a fragile object hangs from the concrete ceilings and is directly connected to the house's electrical circuit. Here the conversion of electrical energy into light takes place between two telescopic antennas without protective insulation. Looking into the extremely glaring light of the bulb leaves the viewer with a residual phantom image.

The video work Stadt in Flammen (1984) by the collective SCHMELZDAHIN is projected in the former storage spaces. From 1979 to 1989, the group around Jochen Lempert, Jürgen Reble, and Jochen Müller experimented with the manipulation of photographic film through biological and chemical processes. For this work, the image strip of a scene from a disaster film about an oil refinery accident was buried unprotected in the garden. The bacterial decomposition process in the soil not only produced an altered image that materialized the movie’s narratives directly in the film material, but itself represents an analogy to the process of the formation of coal and oil.

The work by US artist Noah Barker (*1991) permanently fogs a part of the storefront window with an artificial condensation. Hasty finger drawings on the pane threaten to disappear again at any moment if the temperature and humidity differences between inside and outside change. The drawings trace a network of actors involved in the controversial sale of the Leuna refinery in 1991 backward to its opening in 1917, a compound of West German political scandals spawning in part from the Lower Rhine region.

Patterns as visualized knowledge and instructions for action play a role in the pigment-printed photographs by Erica Baum (*1961). Clippings of sewing patterns, originally mass-produced paper templates that guided the needlework of home tailors, become subjective compositions of form. Typical inscriptions, such as the word "grain," lose their instructive character as the poetic range of meanings and connotations opens up: from the thread of textile fabric to film grain or the propellant of rockets to plant seeds.

Such ambiguity of narrative is also inherent in the story of progress. How steam and machine power not only ushered in the end of domestic handloom weavers but was later also used against an organizing labor force, is examined in a contribution about the first trade unions of the late 19th century around the social democrat Fritz Mende. The archive material compiled by the Geschichtswerkstatt Mönchengladbach, which has dealt with the textile city's history for 25 years, also connects to today's conflicts over lignite extraction at the Garzweiler open-pit mine.

Cotton fabrics are the basis of the two large-format airbrush paintings Plein Air I & II (2018) by New York artist Rochelle Feinstein (*1947). Their compositions borrow from camouflage patterns, made for specific military excursions, such as that of the infamous Operation Desert Storm that was triggered by conflicts over oil in the Persian Gulf. For the exhibition in Mönchengladbach Feinstein developed a new mode of presentation: the paintings lie stacked on a wooden pallet, folded to the packing size of their FedEx air freight delivery box. The material reality of painting and the relationship of content, form, and material is presented here as something inevitably embedded in society's prevailing fossil structures of production and distribution, which are ultimately inscribed in every work of art.









Fire demands its Fuel
April 2021

In hastigen Skizzen hielt der Textilunternehmer Wilhelm Dietrich Lenssen 1827 in seinem Reisetagebuch den Aufbau mechanischer Webstühle in England fest. Im selben Jahr zahlte sich die riskante Industriespionage aus, als sich die erste Dampfmaschine in Rheydt in Bewegung setzte. Bald schon verlangten die Maschinen im Niederrhein eine Vielzahl an Fabrikarbeiter*innen, großangelegten Kohleabbau, Eisen- und Stahlproduktion. Die frühen „Feuer” der Industrialisierung machten Mönchengladbach mit Hilfe von Dampfkraft zum „deutschen Manchester” der Textilproduktion. Sie transformierten nicht nur die Landschaft und sozialen Gefüge, sondern auch das Verständnis von Geschichtlichkeit und Zukunft: Das Diktat der natürlichen Zyklen, Tag und Nacht, Jahreszeiten sowie der absolute Raum schienen überwindbar und Wachstum unbegrenzt. Neue Energiesysteme brachten neue Energie-Kulturen hervor. Das Verbrennen längst verschwundener, in Kohle, Öl und Gas verdichteter Flora und Fauna erscheint bis heute ebenso nebulös wie das Konzept von Energie an sich – die Fähigkeit, Wärme abzugeben, Licht auszustrahlen oder Arbeit zu verrichten. Sehr viel greifbarer erscheinen hingegen die Technologien, Geschichten, Politiken und Institutionen eines auf fossilem Kapital beruhenden Systems (Andreas Malm), das weiterhin den Horizont des Denkens und Handelns und somit auch die visuelle Kultur bestimmt. Kunstproduktion ist hierbei unweigerlich mit den Konflikten um Rohstoffabbau von Garzweiler bis Lubumbashi verwoben. In den einstigen Büro- und Werkstatträumen des seit 1875 in Mönchengladbach ansässigen Elektro-Sanitär-Heizungs-Familienbetriebes F.W. Mertens jr. widmet sich die Ausstellung ‘Fire demands its Fuel’ dieser Beziehung von Kunst, Energie und fossilem Kapitalismus.

Der in der Kupfer- und Kobalt-Bergbaustadt Lubumbashi arbeitende und als Elektroingenieur und Mathematiker ausgebildete Künstler Jean Katambayi Mukendi (*1974) befass sich mit dem Zusammenhang von Energie, ökologischer Krise und kolonialem Erbe in der Demokratischen Republik Kongo. Seine „Afrolamps“, geometrische Kugelschreiber-Zeichnungen stilisierter Glühbirnen und Schaltkreise und eine aus Papier und Pappe, Elektrodrähten und Batterien gefertigte Skulptur bewegen sich zwischen technischen Konstruktionsskizzen und visionären Prototypen zur selbstbestimmten Aneignung von technologischem Fortschritt.

Auch die Reproduktion der Wettbewerbszeichnung für die Erweiterung des Kunstmuseums der Ölstadt Houston des chilenischen Künstlers und gelernten Architekten Juan Downey (1940-1993) ist zwischen utopischer Vision und konkretem Architektur- und Infrastrukturprojekt angesiedelt. 1975, zwei Jahre nach dem Militärputsch in seinem Heimatland, der auf die Enteignung internationaler Minenkonzerne folgte, entwarf Downey für das Gebäude ein autarkes und regeneratives geothermisches System, das Dampf zum Heizen und Kühlen erzeugen sollte. Ursprünglich schlug Downey dem damaligen Direktor des Museums vor, Öl von den Wänden der Ausstellungsräume fließen zu lassen. Jene natürlichen und menschgemachten Energiesysteme durchziehen Downeys Schaffen, das frühe Experimente mit Video-, Computerkunst und Kybernetik umfasst.

Das kinetische Klangobjekt Blaue Pistole (1973) der Nachkriegskünstlerin Irma Hünerfauth (1907-1998) besteht aus einer Komposition aus metallischen Schrottteilen, die wie von einem „Windstoß der Natur” (Hünerfauth) in Eigenschwingung versetzt werden. Das zu hörende, von der Künstlerin geschriebene und gesprochene Gedicht entlarvt den trügerischen Frieden der Wohlstandsgesellschaft ihrer Zeit, die, immer noch von Weltkriegsschrott umgeben, die Aufrüstung bereits wieder fleißig ankurbelte. Hünerfauths „Sprechender Kasten” spielt hier auf die Bedeutung von Waffenproduktion als Motor fossiler Industrialisierung an.

Die cartoonhaft anmutenden „Bomben” der Essener Künstlerin Phung-Tien Phan (*1983) treiben das zerstörerische Potenzial entfesselter Energie figurativ auf die Spitze. Beim näheren Betrachten entpuppen sich die Objekte als schwarz bemalte Gemüse und Früchte, die im Laufe der Ausstellungen zu verrotten und keimen beginnen. Dabei führen die Attrappen mit ihren Zündschnüren die symbolische Logik eines phallischen Kapitalismus ad absurdum, der sich von häuslicher Handarbeit und einer als weiblich konnotierten Natur abzugrenzen und diese zugleich zu unterjochen versucht.

Der skulptural überzeichneten Gefahr der „Bomben” steht die minimalistische Arbeit von Kitty Kraus (*1976) gegenüber. In den Kellerräumen der Galerie hängt ein fragiles Objekt von der Betondecke und ist direkt mit dem Stromkreislauf des Hauses verbunden. Zwischen zwei Teleskopantennen findet hier ohne schützende Isolierung die Umwandlung von elektrischer Energie in Licht statt. Der Blick in das extrem gleißende Licht der Glühbirne hinterlässt im Auge der Betrachter*innen für wenige Sekunden ein Phantombild.

Im ehemaligen Lagerraum ist die Videoarbeit Stadt in Flammen (1984) des Kollektivs SCHMELZDAHIN zu sehen. Von 1979 bis 1989 experimentierte die Gruppe um Jochen Lempert, Jürgen Reble und Jochen Müller mit der Manipulation von fotografischem Film durch biologische und chemische Prozesse. So wurde der Bildstreifen einer Szene eines Katastrophenfilms über ein Erdöl-Raffinerie-Unglück ungeschützt im Garten vergraben. Der bakterielle Zersetzungsprozess im Boden erzeugte nicht nur ein verändertes Bild, das die Narrative des Großbrandes direkt im Filmmaterial materialisierte, sondern stellt selbst eine Analogie zum Entstehungsprozess von Kohle und Öl dar.

Die Arbeit des US-amerikanischen Künstlers Noah Barker (*1991) erweckt den Eindruck, als sei ein Teil einer Schaufensterscheibe mit Kondenswasser beschlagen. Die hastigen Fingerzeichnungen auf der Scheibe drohen jeden Moment wieder zu verschwinden, wenn sich Temperatur- und Luftfeuchtigkeitsverhältnisse innen und außen wandeln. Die Zeichnungen halten die molekularen Formeln von Kohlenwasserstoff fest. Zugleich zeichnen sie ein Netzwerk von Akteur*innen nach – vom umstrittenen Verkauf des Leunawerks 1991 bis zurück zu dessen Eröffnung 1917 – die in eine Reihe westdeutscher Polit-Skandale am Niederrhein involviert waren.

Muster als visualisiertes Wissen und Handlungsanweisungen spielen auch in den pigmentgedruckten Fotografien von Erica Baum (*1961) eine Rolle. Ausschnitte von Nähvorlagen, die ursprünglich als massengefertigte Papierschablonen die Handarbeit von Heimschneiderinnen anleiteten, werden hier zu subjektiven Formkompositionen. Typische Beschriftungen wie das Wort „Grain” verlieren dabei ihren instruierenden Charakter, wenn sich die poetische Bandbreite von Bedeutungen und Konnotationen öffnet: vom Fadenlauf eines Textilstoffes über Filmkörnung oder den Treibsatz von Raketen bis zu Pflanzensamen.

Eine derartige Ambivalenz von Erzählung wohnt auch der Geschichte vom Fortschritt inne. Wie Dampf- und Maschinenkraft das Ende der Weber- und Schneiderinnen in Heimarbeit einleitete und später gegen eine sich organisierende Arbeiterschaft eingesetzt wurde, untersucht ein Beitrag über die ersten Gewerkschaften des späten 19. Jahrhunderts um den Sozialdemokraten Fritz Mende. Das von der Geschichtswerkstatt Mönchengladbachzusammengestellte Archivmaterial schlägt dabei auch eine Brücke zu den heutigen Konflikten um den Tagebau Garzweiler.

Baumwollstoffe sind die Grundlage der beiden großformatigen Airbrush-Malereien Plein Air I & II (2018) der New Yorker Künstlerin Rochelle Feinstein (*1947). Die Motive sind Tarnmustern entlehnt, etwa jenem der berüchtigten Operation „Desert Storm”, deren Ausgangspunkt Konflikte um Öl in der Golfregion waren. Für die Arbeiten entwickelte Feinstein eine neue Präsentationsform: Auf einer Palette liegen die Malereien gestapelt und gefaltet – entsprechend dem Packmaß ihrer Lieferung durch FedEx-Luftfracht. Die materielle Realität von Malerei wird hier als unweigerlich eingebettet in die fossilen Produktions- und Distributionsstrukturen präsentiert, die letztendlich jedem Kunstwerk eingeschrieben sind.

 



Fire demands its Fuel
April 2021

In 1827, the textile entrepreneur Wilhelm Dietrich Lenssen hastily sketched the workings of mechanical looms in England into his travel diary. The risky industrial espionage paid off when, in the same year, the first steam engine was set in motion in Rheydt. Soon the machines in the Lower Rhine region required a large number of factory workers, large-scale coal mining, and iron and steel production. The early "fires" of industrialization grew to engulf the region transforming Mönchengladbach into the "German Manchester" of textile production. Harnessing this new power disrupted not only the landscape and social fabric but also the understanding of historicity and the future. The constraint of natural cycles, day and night, seasons, and absolute space seemed surmountable, unleashing the promise of growth. New energy systems gave birth to new energy cultures. To this day, the burning of former fauna and flora, since condensed into coal and oil, is no less mystifying than the concept of energy itself. As the ability to emit heat, radiate light, or perform work, energy is ubiquitous yet hardly tangible. Easier to grasp are the particular technologies, histories, politics, and institutions of a system founded on fossil capital (Andreas Malm), which continues to determine the horizon of thought and action, as well as visual culture. Inevitably art is interwoven with conflicts over resource extraction, from Garzweiler to Lubumbashi. In the former office and workshop of the electrical-sanitary-heating family business F.W. Mertens jr. located in Mönchengladbach since 1875, the exhibition 'Fire demands its Fuel' turns to the relationship between art, energy, and fossil capitalism.

Working in the copper and cobalt mining city of Lubumbashi and trained as an electrical engineer and mathematician, artist Jean Katambayi Mukendi (b. 1974) operates at the nexus of energy, ecology, and the post-colonial in the Democratic Republic of Congo. His “Afrolamps“ geometric ballpoint pen drawings of stylized light bulbs and circuits - as well as a sculpture made entirely of paper, cardboard and a few electrical parts, move between technical construction sketches and prototypes for a self-determined appropriation of technology.

The reproduction of the 1975 competition drawing for the expansion of the oil city Houston’s Museum of Art by Chilean artist and trained architect Juan Downey (1940-1993) is also situated between utopian vision and concrete architectural and infrastructure projects. Two years after the military coup in his home country that followed the expropriation of international mining corporations, Downey designed a self-sufficient and regenerative geothermal system for the building that would generate steam for heating and cooling. Originally, Downey suggested to the museum's director that oil should flow from the walls of the exhibit spaces. Natural and man-made energy systems permeate Downey's work, which is based on early experiments with video, computer art, and cybernetics.

The kinetic sculpture Blaue Pistole (Blue Gun), made by postwar artist Irma Hünerfauth (1907-1998), functions as a sound object in which a composition of metal scrap pieces is set into vibration as if by a "gust of nature's wind" (Hünerfauth). The poem to be heard, written, and spoken by the artist, exposes the deceptive peace of the affluent society of her time, which, still surrounded by World War II scrap, was already busily rearming. In the exhibition, Hünerfauth's "Talking Box" ultimately alludes to the importance of arms manufacturing as a motor of fossil industrialization.

The cartoon-like "Bombs" by the Essen-based artist Phung-Tien Phan (*1983) figuratively push the destructive potential of unleashed energy to the extreme. On closer inspection, the objects turn out to be black-painted vegetables and fruits that begin to rot and germinate over the course of the exhibitions. In doing so, they take the symbolic logic of a phallic capitalism ad absurdum, which distances itself from and at the same time subjugates domestic manual labor and a feminized nature.

The “bombs“ sculpturally exaggerated danger is contrasted by the minimalist work of Kitty Kraus (*1976). In the basement rooms, a fragile object hangs from the concrete ceilings and is directly connected to the house's electrical circuit. Here the conversion of electrical energy into light takes place between two telescopic antennas without protective insulation. Looking into the extremely glaring light of the bulb leaves the viewer with a residual phantom image.

The video work Stadt in Flammen (1984) by the collective SCHMELZDAHIN is projected in the former storage spaces. From 1979 to 1989, the group around Jochen Lempert, Jürgen Reble, and Jochen Müller experimented with the manipulation of photographic film through biological and chemical processes. For this work, the image strip of a scene from a disaster film about an oil refinery accident was buried unprotected in the garden. The bacterial decomposition process in the soil not only produced an altered image that materialized the movie’s narratives directly in the film material, but itself represents an analogy to the process of the formation of coal and oil.

The work by US artist Noah Barker (*1991) permanently fogs a part of the storefront window with an artificial condensation. Hasty finger drawings on the pane threaten to disappear again at any moment if the temperature and humidity differences between inside and outside change. The drawings trace a network of actors involved in the controversial sale of the Leuna refinery in 1991 backward to its opening in 1917, a compound of West German political scandals spawning in part from the Lower Rhine region.

Patterns as visualized knowledge and instructions for action play a role in the pigment-printed photographs by Erica Baum (*1961). Clippings of sewing patterns, originally mass-produced paper templates that guided the needlework of home tailors, become subjective compositions of form. Typical inscriptions, such as the word "grain," lose their instructive character as the poetic range of meanings and connotations opens up: from the thread of textile fabric to film grain or the propellant of rockets to plant seeds.

Such ambiguity of narrative is also inherent in the story of progress. How steam and machine power not only ushered in the end of domestic handloom weavers but was later also used against an organizing labor force, is examined in a contribution about the first trade unions of the late 19th century around the social democrat Fritz Mende. The archive material compiled by the Geschichtswerkstatt Mönchengladbach, which has dealt with the textile city's history for 25 years, also connects to today's conflicts over lignite extraction at the Garzweiler open-pit mine.

Cotton fabrics are the basis of the two large-format airbrush paintings Plein Air I & II (2018) by New York artist Rochelle Feinstein (*1947). Their compositions borrow from camouflage patterns, made for specific military excursions, such as that of the infamous Operation Desert Storm that was triggered by conflicts over oil in the Persian Gulf. For the exhibition in Mönchengladbach Feinstein developed a new mode of presentation: the paintings lie stacked on a wooden pallet, folded to the packing size of their FedEx air freight delivery box. The material reality of painting and the relationship of content, form, and material is presented here as something inevitably embedded in society's prevailing fossil structures of production and distribution, which are ultimately inscribed in every work of art.









Fire demands its Fuel
April 2021

In hastigen Skizzen hielt der Textilunternehmer Wilhelm Dietrich Lenssen 1827 in seinem Reisetagebuch den Aufbau mechanischer Webstühle in England fest. Im selben Jahr zahlte sich die riskante Industriespionage aus, als sich die erste Dampfmaschine in Rheydt in Bewegung setzte. Bald schon verlangten die Maschinen im Niederrhein eine Vielzahl an Fabrikarbeiter*innen, großangelegten Kohleabbau, Eisen- und Stahlproduktion. Die frühen „Feuer” der Industrialisierung machten Mönchengladbach mit Hilfe von Dampfkraft zum „deutschen Manchester” der Textilproduktion. Sie transformierten nicht nur die Landschaft und sozialen Gefüge, sondern auch das Verständnis von Geschichtlichkeit und Zukunft: Das Diktat der natürlichen Zyklen, Tag und Nacht, Jahreszeiten sowie der absolute Raum schienen überwindbar und Wachstum unbegrenzt. Neue Energiesysteme brachten neue Energie-Kulturen hervor. Das Verbrennen längst verschwundener, in Kohle, Öl und Gas verdichteter Flora und Fauna erscheint bis heute ebenso nebulös wie das Konzept von Energie an sich – die Fähigkeit, Wärme abzugeben, Licht auszustrahlen oder Arbeit zu verrichten. Sehr viel greifbarer erscheinen hingegen die Technologien, Geschichten, Politiken und Institutionen eines auf fossilem Kapital beruhenden Systems (Andreas Malm), das weiterhin den Horizont des Denkens und Handelns und somit auch die visuelle Kultur bestimmt. Kunstproduktion ist hierbei unweigerlich mit den Konflikten um Rohstoffabbau von Garzweiler bis Lubumbashi verwoben. In den einstigen Büro- und Werkstatträumen des seit 1875 in Mönchengladbach ansässigen Elektro-Sanitär-Heizungs-Familienbetriebes F.W. Mertens jr. widmet sich die Ausstellung ‘Fire demands its Fuel’ dieser Beziehung von Kunst, Energie und fossilem Kapitalismus.

Der in der Kupfer- und Kobalt-Bergbaustadt Lubumbashi arbeitende und als Elektroingenieur und Mathematiker ausgebildete Künstler Jean Katambayi Mukendi (*1974) befass sich mit dem Zusammenhang von Energie, ökologischer Krise und kolonialem Erbe in der Demokratischen Republik Kongo. Seine „Afrolamps“, geometrische Kugelschreiber-Zeichnungen stilisierter Glühbirnen und Schaltkreise und eine aus Papier und Pappe, Elektrodrähten und Batterien gefertigte Skulptur bewegen sich zwischen technischen Konstruktionsskizzen und visionären Prototypen zur selbstbestimmten Aneignung von technologischem Fortschritt.

Auch die Reproduktion der Wettbewerbszeichnung für die Erweiterung des Kunstmuseums der Ölstadt Houston des chilenischen Künstlers und gelernten Architekten Juan Downey (1940-1993) ist zwischen utopischer Vision und konkretem Architektur- und Infrastrukturprojekt angesiedelt. 1975, zwei Jahre nach dem Militärputsch in seinem Heimatland, der auf die Enteignung internationaler Minenkonzerne folgte, entwarf Downey für das Gebäude ein autarkes und regeneratives geothermisches System, das Dampf zum Heizen und Kühlen erzeugen sollte. Ursprünglich schlug Downey dem damaligen Direktor des Museums vor, Öl von den Wänden der Ausstellungsräume fließen zu lassen. Jene natürlichen und menschgemachten Energiesysteme durchziehen Downeys Schaffen, das frühe Experimente mit Video-, Computerkunst und Kybernetik umfasst.

Das kinetische Klangobjekt Blaue Pistole (1973) der Nachkriegskünstlerin Irma Hünerfauth (1907-1998) besteht aus einer Komposition aus metallischen Schrottteilen, die wie von einem „Windstoß der Natur” (Hünerfauth) in Eigenschwingung versetzt werden. Das zu hörende, von der Künstlerin geschriebene und gesprochene Gedicht entlarvt den trügerischen Frieden der Wohlstandsgesellschaft ihrer Zeit, die, immer noch von Weltkriegsschrott umgeben, die Aufrüstung bereits wieder fleißig ankurbelte. Hünerfauths „Sprechender Kasten” spielt hier auf die Bedeutung von Waffenproduktion als Motor fossiler Industrialisierung an.

Die cartoonhaft anmutenden „Bomben” der Essener Künstlerin Phung-Tien Phan (*1983) treiben das zerstörerische Potenzial entfesselter Energie figurativ auf die Spitze. Beim näheren Betrachten entpuppen sich die Objekte als schwarz bemalte Gemüse und Früchte, die im Laufe der Ausstellungen zu verrotten und keimen beginnen. Dabei führen die Attrappen mit ihren Zündschnüren die symbolische Logik eines phallischen Kapitalismus ad absurdum, der sich von häuslicher Handarbeit und einer als weiblich konnotierten Natur abzugrenzen und diese zugleich zu unterjochen versucht.

Der skulptural überzeichneten Gefahr der „Bomben” steht die minimalistische Arbeit von Kitty Kraus (*1976) gegenüber. In den Kellerräumen der Galerie hängt ein fragiles Objekt von der Betondecke und ist direkt mit dem Stromkreislauf des Hauses verbunden. Zwischen zwei Teleskopantennen findet hier ohne schützende Isolierung die Umwandlung von elektrischer Energie in Licht statt. Der Blick in das extrem gleißende Licht der Glühbirne hinterlässt im Auge der Betrachter*innen für wenige Sekunden ein Phantombild.

Im ehemaligen Lagerraum ist die Videoarbeit Stadt in Flammen (1984) des Kollektivs SCHMELZDAHIN zu sehen. Von 1979 bis 1989 experimentierte die Gruppe um Jochen Lempert, Jürgen Reble und Jochen Müller mit der Manipulation von fotografischem Film durch biologische und chemische Prozesse. So wurde der Bildstreifen einer Szene eines Katastrophenfilms über ein Erdöl-Raffinerie-Unglück ungeschützt im Garten vergraben. Der bakterielle Zersetzungsprozess im Boden erzeugte nicht nur ein verändertes Bild, das die Narrative des Großbrandes direkt im Filmmaterial materialisierte, sondern stellt selbst eine Analogie zum Entstehungsprozess von Kohle und Öl dar.

Die Arbeit des US-amerikanischen Künstlers Noah Barker (*1991) erweckt den Eindruck, als sei ein Teil einer Schaufensterscheibe mit Kondenswasser beschlagen. Die hastigen Fingerzeichnungen auf der Scheibe drohen jeden Moment wieder zu verschwinden, wenn sich Temperatur- und Luftfeuchtigkeitsverhältnisse innen und außen wandeln. Die Zeichnungen halten die molekularen Formeln von Kohlenwasserstoff fest. Zugleich zeichnen sie ein Netzwerk von Akteur*innen nach – vom umstrittenen Verkauf des Leunawerks 1991 bis zurück zu dessen Eröffnung 1917 – die in eine Reihe westdeutscher Polit-Skandale am Niederrhein involviert waren.

Muster als visualisiertes Wissen und Handlungsanweisungen spielen auch in den pigmentgedruckten Fotografien von Erica Baum (*1961) eine Rolle. Ausschnitte von Nähvorlagen, die ursprünglich als massengefertigte Papierschablonen die Handarbeit von Heimschneiderinnen anleiteten, werden hier zu subjektiven Formkompositionen. Typische Beschriftungen wie das Wort „Grain” verlieren dabei ihren instruierenden Charakter, wenn sich die poetische Bandbreite von Bedeutungen und Konnotationen öffnet: vom Fadenlauf eines Textilstoffes über Filmkörnung oder den Treibsatz von Raketen bis zu Pflanzensamen.

Eine derartige Ambivalenz von Erzählung wohnt auch der Geschichte vom Fortschritt inne. Wie Dampf- und Maschinenkraft das Ende der Weber- und Schneiderinnen in Heimarbeit einleitete und später gegen eine sich organisierende Arbeiterschaft eingesetzt wurde, untersucht ein Beitrag über die ersten Gewerkschaften des späten 19. Jahrhunderts um den Sozialdemokraten Fritz Mende. Das von der Geschichtswerkstatt Mönchengladbachzusammengestellte Archivmaterial schlägt dabei auch eine Brücke zu den heutigen Konflikten um den Tagebau Garzweiler.

Baumwollstoffe sind die Grundlage der beiden großformatigen Airbrush-Malereien Plein Air I & II (2018) der New Yorker Künstlerin Rochelle Feinstein (*1947). Die Motive sind Tarnmustern entlehnt, etwa jenem der berüchtigten Operation „Desert Storm”, deren Ausgangspunkt Konflikte um Öl in der Golfregion waren. Für die Arbeiten entwickelte Feinstein eine neue Präsentationsform: Auf einer Palette liegen die Malereien gestapelt und gefaltet – entsprechend dem Packmaß ihrer Lieferung durch FedEx-Luftfracht. Die materielle Realität von Malerei wird hier als unweigerlich eingebettet in die fossilen Produktions- und Distributionsstrukturen präsentiert, die letztendlich jedem Kunstwerk eingeschrieben sind.